Views of the Chalet School

Tirolean Descriptions | British Views | Swiss Views

Hardback Chalet SchoolThis version of the Chalet School made its appearance on a hardback dustwrapper for Jo Returns to the Chalet School. It is, perhaps, the most technically correct illustration of the Chalet School in the Tirol, including the big surrounding fence, the religious idol, the additional school buildings, frescoes on the plaster and the balcony which runs right around the house.

1973 Chalet SchoolShown on the back of the 1973 paperback version of The Chalet School and the Lintons, this Chalet School is quite similar to the hardback version, but seems to have an extra floor. The additional building shown is also quite different in design to those shown in the hardback version. The big surrounding fence seems to be missing.

1980 Chalet SchoolFrom the 1980 paperback version of Jo Returns to the Chalet School, this illustration doesn't show a whole lot. A side turret-y thing (something which I never expect chalets to have, but which they apparently do have sometimes) seems to belong to the main Chalet building, which has two, perhaps three floors.

1980 Chalet SchoolFrom the 1980 paperback version of The School at the Chalet, this illustration is completely lacking in a turret of any sort. It does, however, feature the balcony which runs right around the house, but has only two floors.


1987 Chalet SchoolFrom the 1987 paperback version of The School at the Chalet, this illustration is very close to the Chalet School I have in my mind. It has the all-important balcony, as well as the fence which blocks the view from the classrooms, and the roof seems to fit the description given of the top dormitories. This time there are three, perhaps four, floors.

1989 Chalet SchoolFrom 1989's Elinor M. Brent-Dyer's Chalet School, this illustration is quite similar to the hardback version of the Chalet School. It has the balcony and the religious icon which are mentioned in the text, but no fence is visible. This time, we are presented with three floors. It does remind me of the gingerbread house though!

Armada Chalet SchoolUsed on Armada's and Collins' paperback reprints throughout the early and mid 1990s, this is probably the most familiar image of the Chalet School. Surrounded by a fence, a balcony runs around the first floor. The whole building is surrounded by a nice garden and flowers grow from the balcony. For some reason, this Chalet is completely different from that of the 1987 version, which would have sported this on its back cover. Why could Armada not make up their minds about the amount of floors and balconies?

1994 Chalet SchoolFrom 1994's The Chalet School Companion, this illustration is quite similar to the Armada logo as seen above. However, its balcony only runs along the front of the house, not all around as is clearly mentioned in the books.

1995 Chalet SchoolFrom the 1995 paperback version of Visitors for the Chalet School, this version of the Chalet School was drawn by Anne Thompson. Although I'm not a huge fan of the style, I must admit that this illustration seems quite correct. The main building is shown, as are two smaller chalets. The whole group is surrounded by a substantial fence. I know that the Chalet was originally a hotel, but I don't think it had so many floors. I see it as having two proper floors and an attic space. The religious icon and the bell-tower are both missing.

1995 Chalet SchoolFrom the 1995 Collin's 2-in-1 paperback version of The School at the Chalet and Jo of the Chalet School, this version of the Chalet School was drawn by Piers Sanford (probably). The all around balcony can be seen here, as can the surrounding fence. I'm a fan of this one, I must admit.

Collins' Chalet SchoolUsed on Collins' late 1990s paperback reprints, this illustration is by Piers Sanford. Although it shows the balcony which runs around the entire building and a surrounding fence, I'm not too fond of this version of the Chalet School. It seems a bit more simplistic than most of the others.